Printmaking

Lithography 

 
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At the drop of a hat 

  "I REALLY LOVE PRINTMAKING. IT'S LIKE A MYSTERY AND YOU'RE TRYING TO FIGURE OUT HOW TO REIN IT IN."

- KIKI SMITH 

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drawing on stone 

Lithography is based on the repulsion of oil and water. Therefore, you cannot touch the stone while drawing due to the oils on your hand. 

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printing process 

Hold onto your hats! You never know just how  your print will turn out until you lift the damp paper from the inked surface of your stone. 

 
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final print 

The final limited edition print is finished with a hand drawn bouquet to individualize each lithography print. 

Process History

Following aquatint in printmaking developments, lithography was invented in 1796 by German author Alois Senefelder as a cheaper method of publishing theatrical works. Lithography is a method of printmaking based on the mutual repulsion of oil and water on the surface of limestone. Lithography began with an image drawn using oil, fat, or wax (hydrophobic). After the drawing was completed, the stone was treated with an acidic gum arabic, etching the areas that were not protected by the grease image. As the stone was kept moist through printing, the oil-based ink would repel the water and adhere to the drawn image. Thus, the ink would transfer to the paper. This is the same process I used above.